Home > Hoof Beats Magazine > Yearling videos: signed, sealed and delivered

Yearling videos: signed, sealed and delivered
Wednesday, September 15, 2010 - by Adam Bowden

       Decrease Text Size    Increase Text Size   Print   Email

The day of yearling videos is always a highly anticipated yet anxious day. When you have a group of yearlings expected to sell well six weeks later the videos provide a chance to showcase the good ones and hide faults in the bad ones. Anyone who thinks the yearling video editing doesn't highlight the positives and downplay the negatives has their head buried in the sand.

When a yearling cruises down the fence line swallowing up the ground, gets to the end, stops, spins around, and blitzes down the line again, I stand there like a proud parent. Now ... that is how my parents felt when I performed well as a child. I wish they would all do as well as Hip #176 and #379.

Unfortunately we have the ones who cruise up and down the fence line in between losing their minds and pretending to be Grand Prix horses. We have changed the shape and length of the paddock, but we cannot seem to stop the occasional horse from trying to leap over it. We have gotten smart over the past couple of years and gotten rid of traditional oak board fence and adopted a safer, more elastic fence that bounces the horse back into the paddock instead of him/her going through it. Thus, fewer injuries. This year we had a horse run full speed into the fence. He bounced back, dusted himself off and continued with the video. In fact, the only cut he had was below his left eye that require one stitch.

The one thing that bothers me about the video day is the pacers. I have no idea why I video the pacers. Our first year we didn't video the pacers and much to others' chagrin, I changed my mind and have done it ever since. Watching a pacer trot down the fence row is almost excruciating. Unless they flip over into a pace, I am not sure what someone is looking at. A good trotter video is different.

I'm not sure the same can be said for the pacers. The ones who move the best, float over the ground, don't interfere with themselves at trot is not comparable to how they will move when they pace. Oh well...not my call.

Editor's Note: The views contained in this column are that of the author alone, and do not necessarily represent the opinions or views of the United States Trotting Association. This post originally appeared at Bowden's own blog, Inner Workings of a Breeding Farm, at http://innerworkingsofabreedingfarm.blogspot.com/.


Related Articles :

The views contained in this column are that of the author alone, and do not necessarily represent the opinions or views of the United States Trotting Association.


Search Articles:

Hoof Beats Magazine Blog
Hoof Beats Magazine The forum of Hoof Beats bloggers, featuring some of the best writers in harness racing: New York writer Tim Bojarski, handicapper Frank Cotolo, Tom LaMarra, Harness Racing Communications’ Ellen Harvey and Ken Weingartner, and Hoof Beats’ T.J. Burkett.
Subscribe to Hoof Beats Magazine


Contact Us
To comment on this blog send an e-mail to tj.burkett@ustrotting.com


Recent Posts

More Posts