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Maywood/Balmoral and horsemen still have no contract
Tuesday, February 18, 2014 - from the Illinois Harness Horsemen's Association

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Editor's Note: The following is a statement from the Illinois Harness Horsemen’s Association. It is presented here unedited, and does not necessarily represent the opinions or views of the United States Trotting Association.

Hinsdale, IL --- For the second week in a row, live harness racing in Illinois has been cancelled because of a contract dispute between the owners of Maywood and Balmoral Park Racetracks and the Illinois Harness Horsemen’s Association. The central conflict surrounds the question of what rights do the horsemen have in directing their own bank account, known in racing as the purse account.

“At the core of this dispute is who decides how to spend money that is clearly earmarked for purses, which essentially are paychecks for the people who make horseracing possible,” said IHHA President Dave McCaffrey. “Those people are grooms, trainers, drivers, veterinarians, blacksmiths, farmers and breeders. Our purse account currently has over $5 million and we want to start racing for that money.”

The current impasse exists because the racetracks have proposed an immediate, substantial cut to purses so that purse money can be dribbled out over the next couple of years. The IHHA has countered saying that horsemen would rather race for similar money as in 2013 at least until the end of the next legislative session.

“It’s very difficult for horsemen to make a living at the current purse levels,” said IHHA board member Mike Knicley. “A decrease in purses now will only make it more difficult to stay employed in this industry.”

The IHHA believes that the very people who provide the horses to race have a better understanding of the impact that purse levels have on the day to day operations. They say that the racetracks miss the point on the effect that an immediate purse cut will have on the quality of life for horsemen.

“It’s like cutting someone’s hourly rate from $12 to $9,” said McCaffrey. “People have to be able to make a living right now. Our money is being held hostage and those purses are paychecks for our families. The bottom line is that the $5 million is our money; we’re not asking for increases, just to use our money to add some stability.”

McCaffrey emphasized that other factors may play a role later in 2014.

“Things can change very quickly in Springfield,” he said. “We don’t know what the legislature will do in the next year, but we do know that hardworking people in racing need to have control of their own money. The question is, do we allow the racetracks to chop purses now so they can race for a couple of more years by having their “labor force,” the ones who put on the show, working for miserable wages, or do we race for 2013 purses now and try and maintain a decent existence?”

While the future for Illinois horse racing is uncertain, a gambling bill is gaining steam again in the Illinois Legislature. Illinois Governor Pat Quinn has said in the past that once a pension bill is passed, he will be able to turn his attention to gambling expansion. Pension reform legislation was signed by the Governor in December 2013. Illinois horseman can only hope that the much needed relief that a signed gaming bill will bring does not come too late.


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